Blog

Latest Blogs

Latest Blogs

Orion on the Dunes
Note: This interview was begun informally in person, and then continued more formally through email. Charlotte Zoe Walker: Orion on the Dunes strikes me as a brilliant example of the art of biography. Were there any particular biographers who you thought of as role models while you were researching and writing this book? What aspects of...
Fracture
  J. D. Schraffenberger: Maybe I’m over-identifying as an editor myself, but I think Fracture is an impressive literary achievement, one that I think most people won’t realize was a huge undertaking requiring a lot of different kinds of meticulous work. You and Stefanie (Brook Trout) have brought together so many remarkable pieces of writing...
Signed Message from Tolan
In 1998, I was living in a small, unclean apartment in the heart of Brooklyn. It was summer, and I was confused, and I decided that the only thing that would help me overcome my confusion was a very long cross country drive, and the only thing keeping me from that drive was the apartment itself, and so I needed, desperately, a subletter. I...
Photo 1
(photos by author) In May of 1909, John Burroughs visited Yosemite Valley as the guest of John Muir. One hundred years later, in May of 2009, I photographed many of the landmarks that Burroughs saw during his brief stay in the valley. In his essay “The Spell of the Yosemite,” Burroughs writes,“Yosemite won my heart at once, as it seems to...
logo
Twenty-two nonprofit poetry organizations from across the United States have formed a Poetry Coalition. Throughout the month of March, the Poetry Coalition presents programs on the theme “Because We Come From Everything: Poetry & Migration.” The theme borrows a line from U.S. Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera’s poem, “Borderbus.” Now,...
Illustration of Candle by Melanie Lambrick
My recent return from yet another AWP (Association of Writers & Writing Programs) Conference, this one in the city where I spent an embarrassing portion of my time as a graduate student haunting second-hand bookstores and dark, empty bars, I’m reminded of what it is that exhausts me about every conference, every workshop, every book fair...
photography by Chris Highland
“An Equal Right to be Wrong” I responded to a blog recently where a man mocked divinity schools for instructing professors and students to use gender-neutral words for God. The blogger sneered that this was being “politically correct” and unbiblical. Normally I wouldn’t engage this mean-spirited ignorance, but I wrote that the intense...
Illustration from 295.1 by Li-Ying Bao
As a professor teaching graphic design and digital multimedia development, I also really enjoy creating illustrations for the literary magazine North American Review.  I regard both illustration and graphic design as means of public visual communication which enhances the impact of the message from the authors, the information initiators, to...
Mount Rushmore and American Flag
Scholars can study the major narratives of American history by reading the pages of the North American Review, from slavery and the Civil War, to the thoughts of nearly a dozen US presidents. Below are the names several presidents, along with links to writings that appeared in previous issues of the North American Review. Some of these...
Illustration by Kali Gregan
Not writing is a lot like breathing; it can continue without notice. And as I moved through my days into weeks and months of not writing, it started to feel completely normal. Like I never wrote at all: I was never that MFA student devouring every book of poems I could get my hands on, fervent, with my own poems coming like extended fever...
Illustration by Anne Lambelet
I like to tell my students that every conversation is a fight. Well, at least in fiction. In fiction, every character has a desire, and it’s usually the case that no two characters have exactly the same desire. It’s also usually the case that dialogue is not just talking—it’s a forum in which characters try to move the situation toward their...
Image of bird by Matt Manley
  Clouds move at the leisure of the wind, whether urgent and gusting or placidly seeming painted upon the sky. Like eagles and falcons, rivers and the wind itself, clouds have provided a permanent and inexhaustible image for freedom. I find it hard not to envy them, yet I would feel unmoored and unnerved by such complete mobility, something...
Art by Christian Blaza
Humans in general could benefit from perspective taking, but Americans in particular could use a hefty dose. Our breadth and diversity slims the likelihood of any singular, epitomal American experience, and as such, the ability to compromise with one another, using a basis of mutual understanding to inform our actions, underpins American...
Photography by Chris Highland
"A New, Secular Scripture” Naturalist John Burroughs wrote, “The book of nature is like a page written over or printed upon. . .in many different languages. . . We all read the large type [with appreciation], but only the students and lovers of nature read the fine lines and the footnotes.” (Leaf and Tendril, 1908).  John Muir spoke of “...
Midwestern
Sometimes poems start with nouns. Could we even go so far as to say all poems begin their at-first fragile lives with the solidity of nouns? In the dark we move, and that moving matters when we bump into something or when our bare foot, warm from the bedclothes, comes down flesh against angle, onto a Lego block. Through the day we touch nouns...
Drinks next to a window
I ate a dead man’s tiramisu this past summer.  I did not plan such a macabre act; one rarely does.  My husband Ryan and I had just become new residents to New York City and new regulars to a French patisserie and café two blocks from our apartment—when the owner and head chef, Jean-Francois, dropped dead from a heart attack.   He was forty-...
A person
Most poems are written in the space between what Wallace Stevens called the “nothing that is not there and the nothing that is,” issued from silence and seeking the resonance and depth of silence. Like Elijah, poets stand on mountaintops and witness fires, earthquakes, and storms, all while waiting for a word from the Divine. Jake Adam York’s...
Image of a skyline
“A Church Of The Future. . .Without God” In The Chicago Tribune, November 1891, Ingersoll was asked, “What is going to take the place of the pulpit?”  His response is chilling for believers, and cause for celebration among the happy infidels.  What he describes is nothing less than a Secular Church for Freethinkers.  Centered in education...
James Hearst
[B]urned in the bold air above you in Black Hawk County are the proudest words we can speak:Here is a man. Let the earth be lucky. from Paul Engle’s poem “James Hearst” in the NAR Fall 1974 issue “Time for bed, Carl. It’s late and you have a long day tomorrow.” That was the only time I heard James Hearst change his voice to try to sound...
Buildings
My arsenal when I enter my poetry workshops is seemingly innocuous: a pen, a 99¢ notebook, and a clay mug that contains a stapled together tea bag.  The tea, bought in bulk, doesn’t hint toward a distant land like Masala Chai nor does it promise a feeling like Calm Chamomile. No, my stuff is just stuff that one could have purchased, and did...
A candle tree
Jeannine Hall Gailey’s Poem “Repeton In Winter” Appeared In Nar Issue 301.4. While writing my newest book, Field Guide to the End of the World, I was careful to balance its darker themes – including mass extinctions, conspiracy theories, ecological disasters, and plagues – with lighter influences, from Cupcake Wars to Anthropologie catalogs...
People of the Broken Neck
Readers of the North American Review may remember from the Summer 2010 issue Silas Dent Zobal’s story “Wretchedness,” which begins with this virtuoso sentence: Salvation goes like this: I’m bulleting snowballs single handed—the right’s occupied with a tumbler of gin—at two youngsters, whose forgotten names cause me to question the nature of...
art
Here's Part Two of "Goodwill" by Jason Lee Brown The Austin mansion had sixteen rooms, including eight bedrooms, and Dee said she wanted to see them all. The two parlor rooms were packed with guests and a white noise of chatter that hung in the air. She held Ed’s hand and pulled him into the butler’s pantry, away from everyone else. Ed...
Illustration by Matteo Gallo
‘Tis The Season! Today We Begin A Story By Jason Lee Brown That Was First Published In Issue 299.1, Winter 2014. We Hope You Enjoy This Two Part Series Which Continues- Tomorrow. Ed and Dee crashed parties, and when they crashed parties, Dee flirted with older married men, and when wives got in her way, she flirted with them, too—eye...
Human shadow
Felicia Zamora’s Poem “A Long Road Never Takes Us” Will Appear In Nar Issue 302.1. What brings you to the page? The incessant lull of the image? Perhaps the habitual pace around the desk, in taunt of your time? The spark of unexplainable inspiration that requires you to bolt toward any mechanism of capture to get it down? The guilt that...

Pages

FIND US:
North American Review
1222 West 27th Street
Cedar Falls, IA 50614

PHONE:
319-273-6455

CONTACT US:
Send us an email.

FIND US:
Facebook
Twitter

 

Up to Top