Blog

Latest Blogs

Latest Blogs

Mount Rushmore and American Flag
Scholars can study the major narratives of American history by reading the pages of the North American Review, from slavery and the Civil War, to the thoughts of nearly a dozen US presidents. Below are the names several presidents, along with links to writings that appeared in previous issues of the North American Review. Some of these...
Illustration by Kali Gregan
Not writing is a lot like breathing; it can continue without notice. And as I moved through my days into weeks and months of not writing, it started to feel completely normal. Like I never wrote at all: I was never that MFA student devouring every book of poems I could get my hands on, fervent, with my own poems coming like extended fever...
Illustration by Anne Lambelet
I like to tell my students that every conversation is a fight. Well, at least in fiction. In fiction, every character has a desire, and it’s usually the case that no two characters have exactly the same desire. It’s also usually the case that dialogue is not just talking—it’s a forum in which characters try to move the situation toward their...
Image of bird by Matt Manley
  Clouds move at the leisure of the wind, whether urgent and gusting or placidly seeming painted upon the sky. Like eagles and falcons, rivers and the wind itself, clouds have provided a permanent and inexhaustible image for freedom. I find it hard not to envy them, yet I would feel unmoored and unnerved by such complete mobility, something...
Art by Christian Blaza
Humans in general could benefit from perspective taking, but Americans in particular could use a hefty dose. Our breadth and diversity slims the likelihood of any singular, epitomal American experience, and as such, the ability to compromise with one another, using a basis of mutual understanding to inform our actions, underpins American...
Photography by Chris Highland
"A New, Secular Scripture” Naturalist John Burroughs wrote, “The book of nature is like a page written over or printed upon. . .in many different languages. . . We all read the large type [with appreciation], but only the students and lovers of nature read the fine lines and the footnotes.” (Leaf and Tendril, 1908).  John Muir spoke of “...
Midwestern
Sometimes poems start with nouns. Could we even go so far as to say all poems begin their at-first fragile lives with the solidity of nouns? In the dark we move, and that moving matters when we bump into something or when our bare foot, warm from the bedclothes, comes down flesh against angle, onto a Lego block. Through the day we touch nouns...
Drinks next to a window
I ate a dead man’s tiramisu this past summer.  I did not plan such a macabre act; one rarely does.  My husband Ryan and I had just become new residents to New York City and new regulars to a French patisserie and café two blocks from our apartment—when the owner and head chef, Jean-Francois, dropped dead from a heart attack.   He was forty-...
A person
Most poems are written in the space between what Wallace Stevens called the “nothing that is not there and the nothing that is,” issued from silence and seeking the resonance and depth of silence. Like Elijah, poets stand on mountaintops and witness fires, earthquakes, and storms, all while waiting for a word from the Divine. Jake Adam York’s...
Image of a skyline
“A Church Of The Future. . .Without God” In The Chicago Tribune, November 1891, Ingersoll was asked, “What is going to take the place of the pulpit?”  His response is chilling for believers, and cause for celebration among the happy infidels.  What he describes is nothing less than a Secular Church for Freethinkers.  Centered in education...
James Hearst
[B]urned in the bold air above you in Black Hawk County are the proudest words we can speak:Here is a man. Let the earth be lucky. from Paul Engle’s poem “James Hearst” in the NAR Fall 1974 issue “Time for bed, Carl. It’s late and you have a long day tomorrow.” That was the only time I heard James Hearst change his voice to try to sound...
Buildings
My arsenal when I enter my poetry workshops is seemingly innocuous: a pen, a 99¢ notebook, and a clay mug that contains a stapled together tea bag.  The tea, bought in bulk, doesn’t hint toward a distant land like Masala Chai nor does it promise a feeling like Calm Chamomile. No, my stuff is just stuff that one could have purchased, and did...
A candle tree
Jeannine Hall Gailey’s Poem “Repeton In Winter” Appeared In Nar Issue 301.4. While writing my newest book, Field Guide to the End of the World, I was careful to balance its darker themes – including mass extinctions, conspiracy theories, ecological disasters, and plagues – with lighter influences, from Cupcake Wars to Anthropologie catalogs...
People of the Broken Neck
Readers of the North American Review may remember from the Summer 2010 issue Silas Dent Zobal’s story “Wretchedness,” which begins with this virtuoso sentence: Salvation goes like this: I’m bulleting snowballs single handed—the right’s occupied with a tumbler of gin—at two youngsters, whose forgotten names cause me to question the nature of...
art
Here's Part Two of "Goodwill" by Jason Lee Brown The Austin mansion had sixteen rooms, including eight bedrooms, and Dee said she wanted to see them all. The two parlor rooms were packed with guests and a white noise of chatter that hung in the air. She held Ed’s hand and pulled him into the butler’s pantry, away from everyone else. Ed...
Illustration by Matteo Gallo
‘Tis The Season! Today We Begin A Story By Jason Lee Brown That Was First Published In Issue 299.1, Winter 2014. We Hope You Enjoy This Two Part Series Which Continues- Tomorrow. Ed and Dee crashed parties, and when they crashed parties, Dee flirted with older married men, and when wives got in her way, she flirted with them, too—eye...
Human shadow
Felicia Zamora’s Poem “A Long Road Never Takes Us” Will Appear In Nar Issue 302.1. What brings you to the page? The incessant lull of the image? Perhaps the habitual pace around the desk, in taunt of your time? The spark of unexplainable inspiration that requires you to bolt toward any mechanism of capture to get it down? The guilt that...
Freaky Dance Party Illustration
The lines/images that trigger my poems rarely stick as the entrance to the final product of my poems. Something that interests me about “Tips for Your Quarter-life Crisis” is that its first line has always been its first line. Well, the first line actually used to be “Don’t feed your kale salad to the wolves,” but when the poem went through a...
Illustration by Jeannie Phan
I write for free or for fees we call nominal. Not as a matter of principle. Certainly not in pursuit of an ideal. I write for free because the economic structure of my country dictates the necessity of this arrangement and institutions (of education, of publication), their agents being people much like myself, admit no alternative. At first...
Cover of the North American Review
I would like to write a little something about my picture “King Pest” which is on the cover of 301.4. It is an illustration for Edgar Allan Poe’s darkly comic story about a plague, two sailors, and a group of remarkable characters who each had one of his or her features (nose, head, ears, etc.) distorted (enlarged) by the pervasive plague....
A barnyard under water
“Moss Called Pond” First Appeared In Nar Issue 301.4.   “Moss Called Pond” chronicles a conversation with water pondering, among other subjects: consumption, wonder, space, temporality, and people known only through pond, by layer and suspended sediment. So, in speaking with a small pond near where I lived, I was able to reconnect with...
Piatkowski illustration
“Pieces of Bennet” by Shelly Owens was published in NAR issue 301.4. I think my writer brain might be toast. I’m a sunburnt snake swimming in my own crackly skin trying to shed myself of myself. Or maybe it’s like Miss Havisham’s house: cluttered with moldy old cake and all the stuff I’ve wanted to get down on the page but haven’t. I’m a...
Woman sitting
“The Study” by Stuart Greenhouse was published in NAR issue 301.4. As I remember it, when I was very young, my mom liked to ask me idle questions in our backyard. Maybe we were reading, maybe watering the garden, maybe watching the dog snuffle around. She was relaxed about it, but there was an urgency too, as if it really mattered what I...
Nightfall
Our Thanksgiving Series Comes To An End With A Piece From Our 290.6, Nov-Dec Of 2005 Issue By Richard Cecil The Night After Thanksgiving As freezing wind made branches whip and snap, a silver—rat? raccoon? no,possum—stopped on the sidewalk up ahead and looked back at me and I looked back at her and stopped. “What are you doing here?” must’...
Sweet Alaska image
Thanksgiving Day – November 24, 2016 – #Givethanks Today’s Poem Was Selected To Remind Us All Of How Truly Special Thanksgiving Is. Cherish Those Around You And Again, Happy Holiday! Thanksgiving He’s thankful for SUVs high enough to hide under like the night in the parking lot when the cops came. Thankful for what memories he has of...

Pages

FIND US:
North American Review
1222 West 27th Street
Cedar Falls, IA 50614

PHONE:
319-273-6455

CONTACT US:
Send us an email.

FIND US:
Facebook
Twitter

 

Up to Top