instagram logo tumblr icon

writing

Illustration by Jessica Mercado

     Poetry gives me a chance to document reality in an emotional way.

     I have lived in New Mexico for twenty-three years now. I bought my house nine days after I drove into town. From the start, I loved watching the way the clouds bubbled and shifted. The light blistered like a lit match, especially on overcast days, and I realized I needed this sort of glory. The climate was nearly perfect. Summers were not too warm and never sticky like the East Coast had been. And they came...

Illustration by Matteo Gallo

I came to writing late, starting at age thirty-four. My artistic life was born a month after my first child was born. I’m not fully conscious of the reasons for this. I only know that my writing often rises out of the dissonance between artistic and family life and that the poem included in the North American Review is no exception. Time is always the enemy. The need to spend time with my wife and children. The need to spend time with my...

Illustration by Melanie Lambrick

There have been many writers who could be described, to varying degrees, as Gnostic, but Susan Howe is one of the most important. Just as William Blake’s Gnostic poetry endeavors to break out of the Corporeal realm and into the Eternal, Howe uses the materiality of language, writing, and history to break beyond them into a psycho-spiritual realm, into the transmundane. Her poetry connects with minds on the other side of living.

In her meditation on Chris Marker’s filmmaking, Howe...

Photography by Chris Highland

“Fear”

(Photos by Author)

No rational person would say we are not living in fearful times. In fact, many irrational people believe we are too! What we perhaps need the most is for someone, anyone, to address our fears with a steady and sensible voice. Once again, Ingersoll steps up and stands out. 

Otherworldly beliefs build their shaky foundation on fearfulness and promise heavenly rewards or hellish punishments. Supernaturalism goes hand...

image

Gift Tower

When I read Siddhartha in Mrs. Stevens’ World Lit class,

the problem I had was reconciling the somber, skinny,

 

beneath-the-lotus-tree Buddha with the smiling,

fat-bellied, shiny golden Buddha beside the register

 

...
Fracture

 

J. D. Schraffenberger: Maybe I’m over-identifying as an editor myself, but I think Fracture is an impressive literary achievement, one that I think most people won’t realize was a huge undertaking requiring a lot of different kinds of meticulous work. You and Stefanie (Brook Trout) have brought together so many remarkable pieces of writing while also creating a feeling of community, which I think is unusual for a publication like this—a beautiful rarity....

Illustration of Candle by Melanie Lambrick

My recent return from yet another AWP (Association of Writers & Writing Programs) Conference, this one in the city where I spent an embarrassing portion of my time as a graduate student haunting second-hand bookstores and dark, empty bars, I’m reminded of what it is that exhausts me about every conference, every workshop, every book fair or reading that I engage in these days:  It’s the people.  I know, I know.  This is not something one admits to if one wants to be successful in the...

Photography by Chris Highland

"A New, Secular Scripture”

Naturalist John Burroughs wrote, “The book of nature is like a page written over or printed upon. . .in many different languages. . . We all read the large type [with appreciation], but only the students and lovers of nature read the fine lines and the footnotes.” (Leaf and Tendril, 1908).  John Muir spoke of “Nature’s Bible” and radical reformer Frances Wright, in her lectures in 1829, shocked her audience with the words: “The true bible...

Illustration by Jeannie Phan

I write for free or for fees we call nominal. Not as a matter of principle. Certainly not in pursuit of an ideal.

I write for free because the economic structure of my country dictates the necessity of this arrangement and institutions (of education, of publication), their agents being people much like myself, admit no alternative.

At first I wrote for free because I believed that “getting my name out there” was a worthwhile use of my time,...

Piatkowski illustration

“Pieces of Bennet” by Shelly Owens was published in NAR issue 301.4.

I think my writer brain might be toast. I’m a sunburnt snake swimming in my own crackly skin trying to shed myself of myself. Or maybe it’s like Miss Havisham’s house: cluttered with moldy old cake and all the stuff I’ve wanted to get down on the page but...

Pages

FIND US:
North American Review
1200 West 23rd Street
Cedar Falls, IA 50613

CONTACT US:
Phone: 319-273-6455
Email: nar@uni.edu

FOLLOW US:

instagram logo tumblr icon

 

SUBSCRIBE TO US:

Go to Online Store

Up to Top