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Latest Blogs

Woman sitting
“The Study” by Stuart Greenhouse was published in NAR issue 301.4. As I remember it, when I was very young, my mom liked to ask me idle questions in our backyard. Maybe we were reading, maybe watering the garden, maybe watching the dog snuffle around. She was relaxed about it, but there was an urgency too, as if it really mattered what I...
Nightfall
Our Thanksgiving Series Comes To An End With A Piece From Our 290.6, Nov-Dec Of 2005 Issue By Richard Cecil The Night After Thanksgiving As freezing wind made branches whip and snap, a silver—rat? raccoon? no,possum—stopped on the sidewalk up ahead and looked back at me and I looked back at her and stopped. “What are you doing here?” must’...
Sweet Alaska image
Thanksgiving Day – November 24, 2016 – #Givethanks Today’s Poem Was Selected To Remind Us All Of How Truly Special Thanksgiving Is. Cherish Those Around You And Again, Happy Holiday! Thanksgiving He’s thankful for SUVs high enough to hide under like the night in the parking lot when the cops came. Thankful for what memories he has of...
Image of a person
Happy Pre-Thanksgiving From The North American Review Artwork by: Clay Rodery  Kindness Been there, done that. Senses multiplied like accordion bellows, the earth lay flat. I feel my body start to equalize as I smoke, my crew cut a jet stream before I realize the drugs have changed – synapses dimmed like gold bubbling in glasses of...
Today
Tuesday’s Poem Was First Published In Issue 296.4, Fall 2011.   Preserve A tall animal has printed the snow drift on this pond’s roof of ice. Incautious to the risk of falling through, it has crossed. Emerson assured a version of me more integral awaits my determination to meet it in woods. He uses me to meet himself in woods in me. On...
cornucopia
In Honor Of The Thanksgiving Holiday, The North American Review Would Like To Start A Series Of Posts This Week And Hopefully Continue Throughout This Season To Show Thanks To All Of Our Contributors For Their Works Of Literature And Art.  We Are Starting This Week Off With A Poem By Trevino L. Brings Plenty Called “Family Ties” Which...
Two boys
“Scenes from a Life of Sport” by Robert Shuster was published in NAR issue 301.3. Some years ago, a friend of mine asked the writers she knew to compose a short piece, on any subject, as a gift for her thirtieth birthday. I found the request delightful—I was, I must admit, rather smitten with Jan’s charms—but didn’t quite know what to do....
Gouache
The story about Beauty came to me in a conversation with a good friend who was asking about the origins of Louisiana Creole people. One thing that kept rising to the surface was this idea that Creoles (especially women) are generally known for their beauty and not much else. Of course, Louisiana Creole women have so many other attributes, as...
Inga Poslitur
I was arguing with my friend Isaac about prose poems, about the line between poetry and prose, and if we should care. This was several years ago. We were in my kitchen, and everyone else at the party was drunk. He pulled out Robert Hass’s wonderful prose poem, “A Story about the Body,” and launched his defense of its poemhood: It’s...
The power of surrender
I live a double life as a poet and a yoga instructor. It’s a curious intersection. The forms are different, but the process surprisingly similar: shedding the unnecessary to find the essential. There’s a lot of unnecessary to surrender. In yoga training, there is continuous undoing, from the narrowed brow to the tightened shoulders, held...
Unnamed
Some time ago, a prominent poet and critic posted a question to social media asking for names of Native American poets publishing now. Curious, I followed the thread. The query was met with a variety of responses: A very few people suggested actual contemporary Native American poets, others put forward the names of 19th century tribal orators...
Power line
When I was younger, the inability of strangers to guess where I was from satisfied my ambition to hide, to conceal, to cover up everything that had made me into who I was. Perhaps then I could convince myself that I was something else. However, after my mother’s death, I found no comfort in the fact that no one could guess I was from where...
  Our Halloween blog features a poem in light of our James Hearst Poetry Prize Contest called "Maria Callas' Tapeworm" from issue 300.4, Fall 2015 by Frank Paino. It's a must read.   Maria Callas’ Tapeworm For Dan Hoyt She loves the way he comes in the sweet tang of blood & raw flesh, how he coils inside her— the way he never says...
Our Halloween treat continues with a story called "Skin Dreams" by Kent Nelson from issue 296.4, Fall 2011. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did. The room is dark; Justine wants darkness to sleep.  It’s a requirement for her, like silence and warmth.  But now a smooth gray light appears as a rectangle around the heavy-lidded blinds, so I...
The North American Review would like to wish everyone a very special Happy Halloween Weekend. Today we have a poem featured by Anne Barngrover from issue 300.4, Fall 2015. Hallucinate the House, Hallucinate the Woods Anne Barngrover is the author of Yell Hound Blues (Shipwreckt Books, 2013) and co-author, with poet Avni Vyas, of the...
Water's Touch
Alyce Miller's poem titled "On Finding a Legless Doll at the Beach Called Park Facing Southeast, California" was published in issue 295.3 of the North American Review.   I consider myself mainly a prose writer, both fiction and nonfiction, but I frequently “dabble” in poetry because subject matter and voice almost always dictate form,...
I hate to start out with a cliche, but art really can make you starve. You can be a stalwart perfectionist when it comes to fine art, be it writing, music or the like. Fine, in that I mean something that builds on our love of the world in which we live, that speaks to the conscience, that speaks to the heart’s struggles, that builds on the...
According to family stories, where we are “from” is a skein of yarn bound tightly around a wooden spool. The yarn is so plentiful that the shape of the skein is no longer oblong but rather more spherical. We are from Chuluota, Florida; from Richmond Hill, New York; Toronto, Canada; Croydon, England; Georgetown, Guyana; New Amsterdam, Guyana;...
Sometimes I wonder if I would choose the life of a freelance poet again - a life that means never feeling secure in a practical sense, a life that means never having a holiday or vacation with pay or even a steady paycheck or pension plan. Right now I am working on completing a 35th year anniversary issue of Lips, a poetry magazine I founded...
An epidemic of deaths hit our family over the five years beginning in 2010. I lost three brothers, a niece, an aunt, two grand-nieces, and a grand-nephew. The youngest to die was one month old, and the oldest had just passed his fifty-sixth birthday. The door to my writing life cracked open to let death in as I tried to make sense of each new...
Is it too sweeping or just too obvious to say that from falling in love to creativity itself, we must be off-balance to become? I find myself trying not to think about writing when I am writing (things themselves…but of course words fall into this category) and, then, thinking of it constantly when I am not. I have been told by smart,...
As I was writing the poem, "Composite Color," crayons had gone through a metamorphosis. There were no longer the eight basic colors of my day. They were replaced by a sixty-four color box and a growing sensitivity to racial connotations. Society had become a melting pot of cautious consciousness and the simple became complex. This simple...
Our Baroque Sustenance by Dan Chelotti
When I was learning how to let poems be poems, I had meaning difficulties. As we learn to read poetry, this is a big problem: the facts shroud us from the mystery of the subject. Students often cry: “if I could only put a little bow on every little fact about poetry, compartmentalize them away into storage, and pull them out the next time I...
On "Goodwill" by Jason Lee Brown
After I publish a story, I usually enjoy feedback from my nonwriter friends more than my writer friends, though both are great. I grew up in a small town in central Illinois, and my hometown friends are blue-collar workers who find it amusing that I publish my little stories in journals they’ve never heard of. What I’ve learned from this...
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Superstition Review is the online literary magazine produced by creative writing and web design students at Arizona State University. Founded by Patricia Colleen Murphy in 2008, the mission of the journal is to promote contemporary art and literature by providing a free, easy-to-navigate, high quality online publication that features work...

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